10 Best Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth) Swordsmen (Ranked)


10 Best Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth) Swordsmen (Ranked)

In Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth), there are many great swordsmen. If you are here, you have surely been wondering, who is the best one amongst them. Even thou everybody has its own favorite, we are bringing you here 10 best Lord of the Rings swordsmen in our opinion.

We won’t include on this list higher beings like Saruman, Sauron or Gandalf. So, in our own opinion, these are the 10 best Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth) swordsmen: Elrond, Glorfindel, Imrahil, Eomer, Aragorn, Boromir, Feanor, Ecthelion, Legolas, and Fingolfin. Continue down this article to find out how we ranked them.

Some characters are different in books and movies, and we will try to somehow combine them. Legolas is a prime example of it. We also have a list of 10 most powerful Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth) wizards ranked if you are interested.

10. Legolas

Legolas was a Sindarin Elf who was part of the Fellowship of the Ring in the Third Age. Son of the Elvenking Thranduil of Mirkwood, Legolas was Mirkwood’s prince, a messenger, and a master archer. With his keen eyesight, sensitive hearing, and excellent bowmanship, Legolas was valuable to the Fellowship in their journey across Middle-earth. He was well-known for becoming friends with the dwarf Gimli, despite their long-held differences.

While Legolas’ skill described in the book is mighty, the movie adaptations further exaggerate his combat prowess to near super-level proportions. Legolas wields his signature weapons of a bow, later a new bow by the lady Galadriel. The signature white knife of the book is replaced with a twin pair of curved fighting knives kept in pouches belted on his quiver. Legolas wields a Rohirrim sword at the Battle of Helm’s Deep, presumably because his daggers would not be very effective from horseback.

9. Ecthelion

Gothmog vs Ecthelion, by Sander Agelink

Ecthelion was an Elf-lord of Gondolin, leader of the People of the Fountain and slayer of Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs. He was also at one point Warden of the Great Gate of Gondolin. Ecthelion had the most beautiful voice and greatest musical talent with the flute of all the people of Gondolin. He led a wing of Gondolin’s forces during the Nirnaeth Arnoediad, “The Battle of Unnumbered Tears”.

In the battle over Gondolin, Ecthelion and his forces made their entrance from the South part of the city, after previously being held in reserve. So terrible was his voice when commanding the drawing of the swords and the killings which followed, that his name became a terror among the enemy and a Warcry to the Eldar. Valiantly fighting side by side with Tuor and his House of the Wing, they drove away from the orcs until almost the Gate was regained. It’s said that Ecthelion and his House of the Fountain slew more orcs than had ever been slain, in all the battles of elves and orcs combined. As Dragons reinforced Morgoth’s army, Ecthelion killed three Balrogs and his sword did “hurt to their fire”. Outnumbered, they had to retreat. When doing so, Ecthelion’s left arm was wounded and his shield fell to earth. Tuor carried him away as they joined the remaining leaders in the Square of the King.

In that place, the great Fountain of the King stood and Ecthelion regained his strength by drinking from it. As seven dragons lead the enemy’s forces towards the Square, the remaining army of Gondolin began a retreat. All but Ecthelion, who remained near the fountain in a stand which was remembered as the most valiant “in all the songs or in any tale”. It was there that he faced Gothmog, Lord of Balrogs.

Ecthelion dueled Gothmog in the battle over Gondolin. During the duel, Ecthelion lost his sword. Gothmog then was about to deliver the final blow when Ecthelion jumped and drove the spike of his helmet into Gothmog’s body. Gothmog then lost his balance and he, along with Ecthelion, fell into the Fountain of the King. Gothmog and Ecthelion both drowned.

8. Feanor

Fëanor was a Ñoldorin elf and one of the Elven kindred that departed from Valinor in the land of Aman, where they had lived with the Valar.

He was born in Valinor, the only child of Finwë, High King of the Ñoldor, and Finwë’s first wife Míriel Therindë. He was a craftsman, gem-smith, and warrior, the maker of the Silmarils and inventor of the Tengwar script. He also created the Palantíri.

Fëanor was made the mightiest in all parts of body and mind; countenance, understanding, skill, and subtlety, of all the Children of Ilúvatar. However, in his personality came flaws, foremost among them selfishness and pride, and at a time these would bring anguish and turmoil to his people.

Feanor is supposed to be the best at everything he sets his mind, so he could probably be best of the swordsmen, but that hasn’t ever been proved.

7. Elrond

What are the Three Rings (Three Rings of the Elves) in Lord of the Rings

Elrond (Sindarin; IPA: “Star-Dome”) Half-elven, Lord of Rivendell, was one of the mighty Elf-rulers of old who lived in Middle-earth from the First Age to the beginning of the Fourth Age. He was the father of Arwen Undomiel, the eventual lover of Aragorn II Elessar.

Elrond initially appears in An Unexpected Journey when the elves of Rivendell ambush the Warg-riders chasing Thorin and Company. Elrond wields Hadhafang (Arwen’s sword in The Fellowship of the Ring) and is accompanied by Lindir. He warmly welcomes Gandalf and Thorin into Rivendell and identifies their respective swords, Glamdring and Orcrist.

Tolkien states: “Aragorn was the best swordsmen to live in the third age, even better than Elrond.

6. Eomer

Éomer was a Man of Rohan and the eventual eighteenth King of Rohan, and first of the Third Line of their kings. In the last decades of the War of the Ring, Éomer was the “Marshal of the Mark”.

Éomer’s sword was called Gúthwinë (Old English for “battle-friend”). He also used a spear.

Eomer was one of the best fighters on horseback, and he would maybe be the best swordsman if we would only look on horses, but on foot, there are better then him.

Tolkien’s description of how they fared at the siege of Minas Tirith suggests that Eomer, Aragorn, and Imrahil are all peers:

These three were unscathed, for such was their fortune and the skill and might of their arms, and few indeed had dared to abide them or look on their faces in the hour of their wrath.

5. Imrahil

Imrahil was the twenty-second Prince of Dol Amroth. Imrahil was the son of Adrahil II. He had two older sisters, Ivriniel and Finduilas. After his father’s death, he became Prince in T.A. 3010. Imrahil had four children: Elphir, Erchirion, Amrothos, and Lothíriel.

Fearless and a skilled leader and a great swordsman, but, like Eomer before him, he is very skilled on horseback, and not so experienced on foot.

Tolkien’s description of how they fared at the siege of Minas Tirith suggests that Eomer, Aragorn, and Imrahil are all peers:

These three were unscathed, for such was their fortune and the skill and might of their arms, and few indeed had dared to abide them or look on their faces in the hour of their wrath.

4. Boromir

Boromir is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien’s legendarium. He appears in the first two volumes of The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers) and is mentioned in the last volume, The Return of the King. He was the heir of Denethor II (the 26th Ruling Steward of Gondor) and the elder brother of Faramir. In the course of the story, Boromir joined the Fellowship of the Ring.

Boromir is portrayed as a noble character who believed passionately in the greatness of his kingdom and fought indomitably for it. His great stamina and physical strength, together with a forceful and commanding personality, made him a widely admired commander in Gondor’s army and the favorite of his father Denethor. As a member of the Fellowship, his desperation to save his country ultimately drove him to betray his companions and attempt to seize the Ring, but he was redeemed by his repentance and brave last stand.

Boromir, fierce, and imposing were hailed as the greatest captain of Gondor in many years; only one in the recent past could be his match as a leader of Gondor- Thorongil, whom we all know to be Aragorn. Boromir is maybe the strongest of all these mentioned here, but also the most hot-headed, which could lead him to make mistakes during combat. He would hold his own for a good while against all of the Three remaining warriors, but be overcome at the last.

3. Glorfindel

Glorfindel was one of the mighty of the Firstborn (the Elves) and was once the lord of the House of the Golden Flower in Gondolin. After his death, he was re-embodied by the Valar to act as an emissary.

Glorfindel was born in Tirion sometime during the Noontide of Valinor and was descended from a house of princes. He followed the House of Fingolfin during the Flight of the Ñoldor, but he took no part in the Kinslaying at Alqualondë.

Glorfindel fought Balrog alone, while his followers watched from afar. He fended himself from the Balrog’s whip and claws, and successfully hewed its iron helm. At the last moment, he pierced the Balrog’s belly and it fell backwards towards the cliff, but it grabbed Glorfindel by his hair and both of them fell into the deep abyss. His body was later borne up by Thorondor, Lord of Eagles, who flew down into the Abyss to rescue Glorfindel’s broken body, returning it to his people who buried him high on the cliffs of the Mountains which surrounded Gondolin. It was said that yellow flowers (possibly celandine) grew on his mound, despite its rocky location.

2. Fingolfin

Fingolfin was the second High King of the Ñoldor in Beleriand; the Ñoldor being one of the three branches of Elves. He was the eldest son of Finwë and Indis, younger brother of Findis, older brother of Irimë and Finarfin, and the younger half-brother of Fëanor. He founded the House of Fingolfin, which ruled the Ñoldor in Middle-earth. His wife was Anairë and his children were Fingon, Turgon, Aredhel, and Argon. Fingolfin was said to be the strongest, most steadfast, and most valiant of Finwë’s sons.

Fingolfin fought Morgoth alone!

He rode to Angband, unhindered by any of Morgoth’s servants, smote upon the gates of Angband and shouted his challenge for all to hear, mocking Morgoth. Morgoth, though still said to be the “mightiest of all things in this world”, was reluctant to face Fingolfin, because, despite his might, he alone of the Valar knew fear. But Fingolfin’s insults could not be ignored without Morgoth losing face before his captains. As such, he donned black armor, took up a great mace, and emerged from Angband. Fingolfin drew his sword, Ringil, and the duel began. Many times Morgoth attempted to smite Fingolfin, but the Elven King managed to dodge all of Morgoth’s blows and wounded the Dark Lord seven times. But after a time, Fingolfin grew weary, and Morgoth beat him to the ground three times. Fingolfin rose up and continued to fight each time, but as Mandos had foretold, no power of the Elves could defeat Morgoth, a Vala. Eventually, Fingolfin stumbled backward into one of the many pits carved by Morgoth’s failed strikes, and Morgoth stepped on the Elven King’s neck and killed him. However, Fingolfin’s last, desperate stroke managed to cut into Morgoth’s heel.

1. Aragorn

Aragorn II, son of Arathorn II and Gilraen, also known as Elessar and Strider, was the 16th Chieftain of the Dúnedain of the North; later crowned King Elessar Telcontar (March 1, 2931 – FO 120 or SR 1541), the 26th King of Arnor and 35th King of Gondor – and first High King of Gondor and Arnor since the short reign of Isildur. He was a great ranger and warrior, and as Isildur’s heir he bore the shards of Narsil, reforged and renamed Andúril, Flame of the West, in the War of the Ring.

Aragorn, being the Ranger of the North, had traveled far and wide in the middle-earth. His skills were not limited to healing and ranging. He had fought orcs throughout his life. In the movies, he has been shown to be conflicted and reluctant to take up the kingship of man. In the books, however, he had a clear, sharp and crisp focus on what he was doing – saving the middle earth and claiming his rightful throne in Minas Tirith. In the battle of Pelennor Fields, with his supreme fighting skills and a towering stature of six and a half feet, he remained unharmed during the battle.

He’s an exceptionally capable fighter, an inspiring commander, and understands strategy and tactics. He’s the whole package.

A lot of people have a watered-down perception of Aragorn from the movie, and for no fault of Viggo Mortensen – he portrays Aragorn’s personality perfectly, I think. However, he was inaccurate in his portrayal of his stature and strength. Aragorn was the last true descendant of a race of supermen that lived hundreds of years, the people of Numenor. To put it in perspective, Boromir had watered down Numenorean blood and stood about 6 and a half feet, and was probably the best warrior in Gondor. Aragorn would be twice as impressive.

He has the will to wrench a Palantir from Saurons control and has managed to take on five Nazgul without getting a scratch on him. Not even to mention having a magical sword.

He is definitely our pick for best Lord of the Rings (Middle-earth) swordsmen.

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