'Tin Can' Review: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

[VIFF Review] ‘Tin Can’: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

TIN CAN is a new Sci-Fi Horror film that functions as two films in one. It has a lot of potential and is a brainf*ck. Read our whole Tin Can film review here!

TIN CAN is a new Sci-Fi Horror film featuring two distinct storylines. And a third in the style of flashbacks to explain how we arrived at the main plot in the first place. While the second half is a massive mindf*CK in many respects, I found myself liking it quite a bit.

We showed it as part of our Fantasia 2021 coverage, which included several films. Nonetheless, I do not doubt that this is a film that I will remember long after we have finished watching all of the movies we are reviewing this year. I mean, come on!

Tin Can, as previously stated, essentially has two stories. First, we encounter the main character (played brilliantly by Anna Hopkins) in what appears to be a tin can (hence the title). We learn via flashbacks that a fatal epidemic has struck the Earth, which is most likely part of a possible remedy.

And, no, the plague is not the same as the epidemic we are presently experiencing.

Instead, it is a fungus that develops on human skin and parasitically infects our bodies. It resembles snails or a giant milky jellyfish. This plague’s excellent and easy practical effects demonstrate how it works.

Tin Can reminded me a little of Oxygen, which was recently released on Netflix. Mainly because we’re confined within this little area with one character talking with others and trying to figure out how to get out of the situation she’s in.

The movie changes after she exits (which she does around halfway through). It grows even weirder in some respects, but it also provides a wealth of new knowledge. I’m not going to reveal anything about the second part of Tin Can here. You’ll have to watch it to find out for yourself.

A word of caution: anybody with a penis may want to turn away during one moment in Tin Can. It’s an essential point in the tale, but that sequence made me uncomfortable.

'Tin Can' Review: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

Don’t worry; you’ll recognize the scenario I’m referring to when you see it. Tin Can only has one scene involving a penis!

Tin Can is directed and co-written by Seth A. Smith. Darcy Spidle is the other screenwriter on the project, and the two have previously collaborated on many genre films. The horror mystery The Crescent (2017) and the fantasy mystery Lowlife (2017) are among them. (2012).

The latter was Seth A. Smith’s debut feature film and premiered at Fantasia, so it’s only fitting that he’s returning to the festival with this new feature picture as well. The budget for Lowlife was only $5,000, and I’m sure it was much more significant for Tin Can, which had stunning graphics and effects.

While Anna Hopkins is the undisputed star of Tin Can, Michael Ironside also appears in the film. But don’t expect to see him too often. After all, much of the action takes place in a tin can, with the main character and others in these primitive life-suspension chambers.

SCORE: 6/10


'Tin Can' Review: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

[VIFF Review] ‘Tin Can’: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

TIN CAN is a new Sci-Fi Horror film that functions as two films in one. It has a lot of potential and is a brainf*ck. Read our whole Tin Can film review here!

TIN CAN is a new Sci-Fi Horror film featuring two distinct storylines. And a third in the style of flashbacks to explain how we arrived at the main plot in the first place. While the second half is a massive mindf*CK in many respects, I found myself liking it quite a bit.

We showed it as part of our Fantasia 2021 coverage, which included several films. Nonetheless, I do not doubt that this is a film that I will remember long after we have finished watching all of the movies we are reviewing this year. I mean, come on!

Tin Can, as previously stated, essentially has two stories. First, we encounter the main character (played brilliantly by Anna Hopkins) in what appears to be a tin can (hence the title). We learn via flashbacks that a fatal epidemic has struck the Earth, which is most likely part of a possible remedy.

And, no, the plague is not the same as the epidemic we are presently experiencing.

Instead, it is a fungus that develops on human skin and parasitically infects our bodies. It resembles snails or a giant milky jellyfish. This plague’s excellent and easy practical effects demonstrate how it works.

Tin Can reminded me a little of Oxygen, which was recently released on Netflix. Mainly because we’re confined within this little area with one character talking with others and trying to figure out how to get out of the situation she’s in.

The movie changes after she exits (which she does around halfway through). It grows even weirder in some respects, but it also provides a wealth of new knowledge. I’m not going to reveal anything about the second part of Tin Can here. You’ll have to watch it to find out for yourself.

A word of caution: anybody with a penis may want to turn away during one moment in Tin Can. It’s an essential point in the tale, but that sequence made me uncomfortable.

'Tin Can' Review: Mind Blowing Sci-fi Horror

Don’t worry; you’ll recognize the scenario I’m referring to when you see it. Tin Can only has one scene involving a penis!

Tin Can is directed and co-written by Seth A. Smith. Darcy Spidle is the other screenwriter on the project, and the two have previously collaborated on many genre films. The horror mystery The Crescent (2017) and the fantasy mystery Lowlife (2017) are among them. (2012).

The latter was Seth A. Smith’s debut feature film and premiered at Fantasia, so it’s only fitting that he’s returning to the festival with this new feature picture as well. The budget for Lowlife was only $5,000, and I’m sure it was much more significant for Tin Can, which had stunning graphics and effects.

While Anna Hopkins is the undisputed star of Tin Can, Michael Ironside also appears in the film. But don’t expect to see him too often. After all, much of the action takes place in a tin can, with the main character and others in these primitive life-suspension chambers.

SCORE: 6/10

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