Every X-Men Movie Ranked From Worst to The Best (2000-2019)

Every X-Men Movie Ranked From Worst to The Best (2000-2019)

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases. We also participate in other affiliate programs and are compensated for referring traffic and business to them.

At a time when we may be oversaturated with various superhero franchises that don’t seem to stop any time soon, June 2019 brought us to the end of the first of those series, the one that started in 2000 with Singer’s film X-Men and ended with the release of Kinberg’s film Dark Phoenix. Although the last film from this franchise, The New Mutants, is canonically connected to the franchise, there are several reasons why we are doing this list without it – it wasn’t related to the X-Men series and the film isn’t associated in any way with the MCU franchise either.

Although they were never hailed as MCU or DCEU films, X-Men unquestionably left a mark on the development of superhero franchises and these 12 films, despite being less exposed in fact, were the foundation of all that we love today. The X-Men were the first to have a connected film universe, the same characters and a common story they built, which went through so many different changes, challenges and saturations so beautifully and lasted for almost 20 years. In addition, with earnings of nearly six billion dollars, X-Men are the seventh most successful film franchise in history, ahead of much more exposed series like Transformers, Pirates of the Caribbean or Mission: Impossible.

In this article, we will bring you all the movies from the X-Men series, ranked from worst to best. In addition to brief information about each film, we will also give our evaluation of the same and a brief explanation of the placement. The aim of this text is to give a comprehensive overview of the author of this extremely expensive franchise, but also a kind of homage to a series that, unfortunately, has come to an end, because of what Marvel and Kevin Feige will do with mutants will not be like this.

Let’s get to it then…

12. X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE (2009)

Directed by: Gavin Hood
Screenplay: David Benioff, Skip Woods
Composer: Harry Gregson-Williams
Cast: Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Liev Schreiber (Victor Creed / Sabertooth), Ryan Reynolds (Wade Wilson / Deadpool), Danny Huston (William Stryker), Taylor Kitsch (Remy LeBeau / Gambit)

Rating: 5/10
Explanation: Although this film was supposed to launch a series of origin films about the characters in the franchise, Wolverine proved to be a completely unnecessary failure and by far the worst sequel from the franchise. While the fraternal dynamics between Victor (Liev Schreiber) and Logan (Hugh Jackman) was solid, and Jackman once again put everything into his role, this adrenaline-fueled cliché full of silly plots and unnecessary characters eventually turned out to be Rambo on a bad trip.

11. THE WOLVERINE (2013)

Directed by: James Mangold
Screenplay: Mark Bomback, Scott Frank
Composer: Marco Beltrami
Cast: Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Tao Okamoto (Mariko Yashida), Svetlana Hodchenkova (Dr. Green / Viper), Famke Janssen (Jean Gray)

Rating: 5.5 / 10
Explanation: This “Japanese Wolverine” is just as bad as the previous film on the list, in some respects even worse, but it draws two things – the atmosphere and the connection to the earlier story. Without these elements, this “bodyguard-version” of Logan fighting kindergarten-stupid villains (among them, it seems to me, is Megatron, or some big metal ninja) would be a complete disaster, but another excellent Jackman interpretation because of Jean Gray of the traumatized Logan in atmospheric Japan brought just enough to pull him out of the abyss.

10. DARK PHOENIX (2019)

Directed by: Simon Kinberg
Screenplay: Simon Kinberg
Composer: Hans Zimmer
Cast: James McAvoy (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Sophie Turner (Jean Gray / Phoenix), Jessica Chastain (Wolf), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique), Nicholas Hoult McCoy / Beast)

Rating: 7/10
Explanation: Dark Phoenix ended the saga as an unworthy last chapter. In this second treatment of an already familiar story, Kinsberg and the rest of the team failed in many aspects, from character development to the narration itself, and made a film that not only was not stylistically aligned with other films in the “young” X-Men series he didn’t even know which direction to go. While not as disastrous as the previous two films on the list, Dark Phoenix is watchable, but nothing more than that.

9.  X2 (2003)

Directed by: Bryan Singer
Screenplay: Michael Dougherty, Dan Harris, David Hayter
Composer: John Ottman
Cast: Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Ian McKellen (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Famke Janssen (Jean Gray), James Marsden (Scott Summers / Cyclops), Halle Berry (Ororo) Munroe / Storm), Rebecca Romijin-Stamos (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique), Brian Cox (William Stryker)

Rating: 7/10
Explanation: From ninth place onwards, there are actually no bad X-Men films, despite some identical ratings, so we start with the second sequel in the series, which, although perhaps the weakest good X-Men film, still has significant qualities compared to the last three films. . With a strong cast and excellent interpretations by the three protagonists – Stewart, McKellen, and Jackman – the X2 retrospectively lost some of its quality (although it was extremely relevant at the time) due to its resemblance to the first film and somewhat less inventiveness in the field.

8. X-MEN (2000)

Directed by: Bryan Singer
Screenplay: David Hayter
Composer: Michael Kamen
Cast: Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Ian McKellen (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Famke Janssen (Jean Gray), James Marsden (Scott Summers / Cyclops), Halle Berry (Ororo) Munroe / Storm), Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique)

Rating: 7.5 / 10
Explanation: The first film in this series was once a true masterpiece of the superhero genre that pushed the boundaries. Although aesthetically very similar to The Matrix, X-Men managed to profile itself as an artistically independent film and a deeply intimate project by Bryan Singer, who, with an excellent cast, greatly started this 20-year-old series. Although a truly commendable and revolutionary work, X-Men eventually lost more lasting significance in the struggle with the high artistic and narrative power of later films.

7. X-MEN: APOCALYPSE (2016)

Directed by: Bryan Singer
Screenplay: Simon Kinberg
Composer: John Ottman
Cast: James McAvoy (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Sophie Turner (Jean Gray / Phoenix), Jessica Chastain (Wolf), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique), Nicholas Hoult McCoy / Beast), Olivia Munn (Psylocke), Oscar Isaac (En Sabah Nur / Apocalypse)

Rating: 7.5 / 10
Explanation: Although met with much criticism, Apocalypse is in many ways an underrated work that has suffered more from a lack of inventiveness and reliance on visual effects than from its story. En Sabah Nur, or Apocalypse, was a truly compelling antagonist, and the film also featured several other excellent acting interpretations by James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, and other mutants. With a very good atmosphere and style, but, true, a lack of innovation compared to earlier works, Apocalypse is fully deserved on the middle list.

6. DEADPOOL 2 (2018)

Directed by: David Leitch
Screenplay: Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick, Ryan Reynolds
Composer: Tyler Bates
Cast: Ryan Reynolds (Wade Wilson / Deadpool), Morena Baccarin (Vanessa), Julian Dennison (Russel Collins / Firefist), Zazie Beetz (Domino), Josh Brolin (Cable)

Rating: 8/10
Explanation: While the second part of the story of Wade Wilson, or Deadpool, was just as charming, fun, and wacky as the first – it was just that, just the same. Although Reynolds reaffirmed that probably no one else could have ever played this role better, and the story was even more compelling than the first part, it lacked the originality that so wonderfully graced the first film. Far from it Deadpool 2 is bad, in fact, there aren’t any bad things there, but it just didn’t surpass its predecessor and that’s why it’s on this place.

5. X-MEN: THE LAST STAND (2006)

Directed by: Brett Ratner
Screenplay: Simon Kinberg, Zak Penn
Composer: John Powell
Cast: Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Ian McKellen (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Famke Janssen (Jean Gray / Phoenix), James Marsden (Scott Summers / Cyclops), Halle Berry (Ororo Munroe / Storm), Rebecca Romijn-Stamos (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique)

Rating: 8.5 / 10
Explanation: Probably the most controversial placement on this list, I believe The Last Stand is a very apt and epic ending to the first X-Men trilogy. Continuing the somewhat camp atmosphere of Singer’s films, which were the “kids of the 90s,” The Last Stand brought us another free interpretation of the story of the mad Jean Gray and the epic clash among the mutants, which changed many relationships. It may not be the most effective and consistently realized, but the dark character of this film, as well as the fact that it was quite revolutionary for its time (gathering all the heroes before Avengers and Justice League!), definitely contribute to its quality. In addition – X-Men dared to kill the main character, which is a rarity for Hollywood movies, and the extra points go the way it was performed. This was the end of the first phase of the X-Men movies and it was, in fact, a much more satisfying and appropriate ending to a single story than the previously mentioned Dark Phoenix.

4. DEADPOOL (2016)

Directed by: Tim Miller
Screenplay: Rhett Reese, Paul Wernick
Composer: Tom Holkenborg
Cast: Ryan Reynolds (Wade Wilson / Deadpool), Morena Baccarin (Vanessa), Ed Skrein (Francis Freeman / Ajax)

Rating: 9/10
Explanation: Although we all knew who Deadpool was and how much madness we could expect from him, the fact that we would see almost all of it on screen as well, and that Hollywood censorship policies would be so liberal? We didn’t expect that. However, Ryan Reynolds not only made the role of his life in this film but presented one hilarious and vulgar film in a way that is, in some way, a work of art. In any case a revolutionary and indescribably surprising film, Deadpool deserves its place among the best works of this series.

3. X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (2011)

Directed by: Matthew Vaughn
Screenplay: Ashley Edward Miller, Zack Stentz, Jane Goldman, Matthew Vaughn
Composer: Henry Jackman
Cast: James McAvoy (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Michael Fassbender (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique), Kevin Bacon (Sebastian Shaw), Nicholas Hoult (Hank McCoy / Beast)

Rating: 9/10
Explanation: After The Last Stand marked the end of the X-Men as we knew it until then, the series needed to be revitalized and refreshed, and First Class was the right move. Taking the series back, in the Cold War era, we found out who the X-Men really were and how they were formed in the first place. With an innovative approach, a great story, and a wicked villain in the form of Sebastian Shaw (Kevin Bacon), First Class was not only a great step forward for X-Men, but also one of the highest quality works from the entire series.

2. X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST (2014)

Directed by: Bryan Singer
Screenplay: Simon Kinberg
Composer: John Ottman
Cast: James McAvoy and Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Michael Fassbender and Ian McKellen (Erik Lehnsherr / Magneto), Peter Dinklage (Bolivar Trask), Jennifer Lawrence (Raven Darkhölme / Mystique), Anna Paquin ), Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Shawn Ashmore (Bobby Harris / Iceman)

Rating: 9.5 / 10
Explanation: I have long hesitated between First Class and this film in terms of second place, but I still opted for Days of Future Past, not so much because it is objectively artistically better than its predecessor, but because it is unquestionably the most dynamic, complex and the most daring X-Men film and a film that like no other has managed to create an authentic sense of danger and tension. Due to the fact that throughout the film you really had the feeling that the world as you know it will fall apart and that because of that the past and the future must unite, regardless of the parties, but also the excellent farewell interpretations of Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart (not counting Logan) and another powerful Jackman role, Days of Future Past is the ultimate essence of the core of the X-Men series and a true, narrative masterpiece.

1. LOGAN (2017)

Directed by: James Mangold
Screenplay: Scott Frank, James Mangold, Michael Green
Composer: Marco Beltrami
Cast: Hugh Jackman (Logan / Wolverine), Patrick Stewart (Charles Xavier / Professor X), Dafne Keen (Laura / X-23), Richard E. Grant (Dr. Zander Rice)

Rating: 10/10
Explanation: Nolan was there with his trilogy, the ingenious Wonder Woman arrived in parallel, but Logan is something special. Logan is the essence of not only Jackman’s career, but also the depth and innovation that the X-Men represented better than any film universe. Only the X-Men were ready to push their own borders this far, while neither the MCU, nor the DCEU, nor the other series, went so strongly beyond their own dimensions – they stretched them, but did not break them. Probably the best role of a career for Hugh Jackman that should’ve been awarded an Oscar as much as Ledger’s Joker (only Logan is a positivist here), this story of rebuilding a ruined future on the ruins of soothing Professor X is one deep, dark and emotional story that is not only the best X -Men movie, but one of the best comic book adaptations ever.

Scroll to Top