According To Hawkeye’s Producer, ‘Rogers: The Musical’ Could Become A Real Thing

If you watched the first episode of Hawkeye, Marvel’s newest Disney+ series, you probably know what ‘Rogers: The Musical’ is. The musical inspired by the famous battle of New York against Chiaturi can be seen on Broadway, but only if you’re living inside the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The first episode of the series showed Clint Barton/Hawkeye watching the musical with his kids in a theater. As an Avenger and someone who was on the frontline of that battle in New York, Hawkeye knows how it all went down, but the musical added some characters that weren’t there – like Ant-Man. The scene also showed us Clint’s hearing loss for the first time, which is the consequence of all the battles he fought as an Avenger.

Although Rogers: The Musical only exists in a fictional universe now, the producer of the series Trinh Tran revealed that she would love for it to become a real thing.

I’d love to make a musical one day for Marvel, right? Who wouldn’t? Rogers: The Musical started out as an idea in the backdrop as we were in the writers’ room. It wasn’t anything that [Clint Barton] was gonna go and attend an event, it was just sort of, “We’ll see billboards of it. How fun would it be if we picked an instance in the past that the Avengers have experienced and do a musical about that?”

Trinh Tran for The Reel Rejects

Rogers: The Musical featured a song called Save The City, which Marvel Entertainment officially released soon after the episode’s premiere. The song was written by Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman. Shaiman also composed the music. The part of the song is a callback to Captain America’s most famous line “I could do this all day.” You can hear the song down below:

The first two episodes of Hawkeye are now available on Disney+. New episode will come out next Wednesday.

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