‘Halloween Ends’ Ending, Explained: Does Halloween Really End in Halloween Ends?

Welcome to the Ending Explained for Halloween Ends, the latest installment in the Halloween franchise of films. The now legendary first Halloween film from the 70s is one of the most influential and important films in cinema history. The John Carpenter film created the entire slasher film genre, and with it millions of fans who still nowadays revere the genre and the figure of Michael Myers as one of the best villains in movie history. So, expectations were high when David Gordon Green announced that his trilogy of films would be a direct sequel to the original.

Halloween Ends is the last film in the trilogy that began in 2018. COVID-19 and other hiccups on the way managed to delay the last two films unexpectedly, but we are finally here, the last film, the conclusion to the trilogy, and probably the saga. Reactions have been mixed. The film seems to have angered fans of the franchise because it turns the final clash between Laurie and Micheal into something more thematic and into something much less active. Only time will tell if audiences will rethink their opinions of the movie, but this is it. Evil dies tonight!

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The following paragraphs contain spoilers for Halloween Ends. Read at your own risk.

What Happens To Laurie And Allyson After Halloween Kills?

In the previous film in the franchise, we saw the entire town of Haddonfield rising up to fight against the evil that has been hurting them for decades, Michael Myers. The assassin survived, of course, the events of the first film in the trilogy, and the film put our protagonist, Laurie, in the back seat for most of the movie. This was truly a disappointment because audiences are here to see Laurie face Michael, but director David Gordon Green and his team of writers had something else in mind.

The same happens in Halloween Ends, as the movie begins not with Laurie or Michael but with the introduction of a new and important character for the series, Corey Cunningham. We are introduced to Corey as we see him babysitting an awful kid named Jeremy. This intro sequence serves two purposes: to ignite Corey’s arc for the rest of the film and bring the idea that Michael Myers’ doings have affected the town of Haddonfield and even the audience in profound ways.

While playing hide and seek, Jeremy locks Corey in a room. However, when Corey, who is a lot bigger and stronger than the little kid, opens the door using all of his strength, the kid ends up being thrown from his house’s second floor. Jeremy lands there, in front of his parents, dead. It was an accident, we saw it. However, this does not matter to the people of Haddonfield, who turned on Corey and transformed him into a pariah. The rest of the film will focus on Corey and his relationship with the town.

At the same time, Laurie has turned back in time in some ways. After Michael disappeared in the last movie, Laurie transformed into a classic grandmother, baking and weaving scarves. Allyson has become a nurse, and she lives with Laurie. The two stories begin to merge when Laurie stops some bullies from attacking Corey, and Corey begins to date Allyson after they are introduced. This is where the movie becomes more of a thematic exploration and less of a classic Halloween film.

Does Halloween Really End In Halloween Ends?

The title Halloween Ends really sets the expectations for the movie. Is this really going to be the last outing of Michael and Laurie? Halloween Kills slogan, “Evil dies tonight” ended up being a lie, but with the word “Ends” in the title, it seems like the movie has no other choice but to put The Shape to rest. However, to reach that point, the movie has to go through some steps first. The first of those steps is to have a long talk about hate and about how the environment shapes you and your behavior.

When Michael Myers is called The Shape, the title makes you wonder, the shape of what? What does Michel represent? This movie tells us that Michael was molded from very early on to represent evil on Earth. The Shape, the mask with no emotion, is basically humanity staring back at it, all facade and no substance. It is a very bleak take, but The Shape is actually the shape of humanity, what society tries to turn each individual in—a source of evil, hatred, and murder.

This is what happens to Corey during the film. He has become a pariah in the town, and he receives abuse not only from the adults and kids in town but also from his own family as well. Things start to look better for Corey when he meets Allyson, but even Laurie realizes that something is happening deep inside his mind. When she looks at Corey, she is reminded of Michael as they are walking the same path. She recognizes The Shape in Corey. Michael also does the same when he meets Corey and doesn’t kill him but actually takes him under his wing.

Corey then becomes the new Shape and kills those who hurt him. This road leads him to Laurie, but unlike the others, she is ready to face him. In the end, Corey kills himself and tries to make it seem as if Laurie was the one who did it. All in vain, as the movie quickly turns into what audiences want. A final showdown between Laurie and Michael. It is brutal and it seems the rivals will end up killing each other at one moment. However, Allyson arrives and saves Laurie. They cut Michael’s neck and wrists and leave him there to bleed out.

In one final moment, the inhabitants of Haddonfield put Michael’s corpse on a car and take him to the junkyard. Michael’s corpse is thrown into a shredder, and there, in front of the people of Haddonfield and the audience, Michael’s body is destroyed. Killing him for sure for the first time in the history of the franchise. However, as the movie told us before, this is not the end of evil, as evil can take its shape in all of us.

  • Nelson loves all things related to storytelling. He has spent most of his life studying narrative, applied across all mediums; film, TV, books, and video games. Mulholland Drive is his favorite film.