Here’s When Naruto Adopted Kawaki – Episode Explained

Did Naruto Adopt Kawaki in Which Episode
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With every new episode, the Boruto: Naruto Next Generations series is getting closer to the infamous scene of older Kawaki and Boruto postering on the ruins of Konohagakure. Two boys became a focal point of the Boruto series, and frankly, it became better than ever. Kawaki’s introduction brought many interesting plot points and character developments we didn’t expect from our main protagonists. Particularly, Naruto, whose fatherhood was questioned in the Boruto series regarding Kawaki, showed how much he cares for unfairly treated children. But when did Naruto adopt Kawaki?

  • Article Breakdown:
  • Naruto adopted Kawaki in Episode 193, titled “Coexistence” of the Boruto series.
  • Naruto decided to take Kawaki in when the boy was admitted to the hospital before the Uzumaki family knew of Kawaki’s name.
  • Naruto brings Kawaki to his house after he learns that the boy was part of the experiments that killed many young children and was supposed to become a vessel for the Ōtsutsuki clan. 

How did Naruto find Kawaki in the Boruto series?

Kawaki’s origin story is tragic, to say the least. Born in a dysfunctional family without a mother and a drunk, negligent father who only thought of himself, Kawaki was destined to fail from the start. The young boy tried to appease his alcoholic father since he could walk and wanted someone to love him. Of course, just when he thought that there was someone in the world who would give him a chance, Kawaki was greatly disappointed and betrayed.

The man who introduced himself as a goldfish merchant gave young Kawaki false hope and revealed himself as Jigen, a man looking for candidates to transfer his Kāma to become their vessel. Kawaki was exposed to experiments since childhood, leaving huge scars and trauma that followed him to today.

kawakiz
Kawaki is deeply traumatized.

When Naruto first saw Kawaki and brought him to Ryūtan City to Advanced Technology Research Insitute, he knew the young boy was full of baggage. Kawaki attacked everyone, escaped the facility, and was eventually stopped by Naruto.

Both Sumire and Naruto realize that Kawaki is emotionally traumatized and that they will need to help the boy in the long run. Eventually, Kawaki woke up in the hospital, where he officially met Naruto, who had already decided that Kawaki would live with him and his family to heal him and help him like Iruka-sensei did when he was young and abandoned.

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So yes, Naruto found Kawaki at rock bottom and made it his mission to help the boy in the best way possible.

When and why Naruto adopted Kawaki in the Boruto series?

Everyone knows that Naruto is a good and passionate person, and as an adult, Seventh Hokage tries every second to ensure Konohagakure is safe. Naruto said multiple times in his conversations with Boruto that the whole village is his family, and if someone attacks his family, he takes it personally. You could say that Naruto is a true wielder of Will of Fire, the village philosophy founded by Hashirama Senju that continued for many generations.

Naruto obviously loves his family, but the role of the Hokage brings him the baggage of being absent from his home, which Boruto takes to heart more than anyone. Boruto thinks his father cares more for his job than his own family, and that’s the main point of conflict between Naruto and his son in the series. When Kawaki entered the picture, Boruto was confused, angry, and sad that his father would take in some stranger and invite him to their house to live.

kawaki and naruto 3
Naruto found Kawaki and immediately wanted to take care of him.

After Kawaki escaped the Konoha hospital, the boy tried to escape from everything and everyone and escape alone. However, Naruto being much more skilled than Kawaki, subdued him and took him to his home. Episode 193, titled “Coexistence,” presents us with Kawaki having a hard time adapting to new surroundings, a place to stay that has the potential to be his home. Of course, being used by Kara and transformed into a weapon of destruction prevented Kawaki “from having happy thoughts.”

Still, Naruto wanted to change that, and he did that by inviting Kawaki to his family home. Himawari and Hinata supported the notion immediately, but Boruto was shocked and angry that Naruto was bringing a dangerous person to their home. He knew what Kawaki did in Ryūtan City and thought that boy was an enemy. After the Kawaki outburst and the whole “vase situation,” Boruto is really mad because he made Himawari upset and goes with his father to talk.

Boruto asks Naruto why he gives a chance to a dangerous, powerful boy who is insensitive to others. Naruto tells Boruto that he’s childhood was filled with hate and fear from other people. Because of the tragedies and actions outside his control, Naruto was feared and dismissed by his fellow villagers, and that affected him in a way few people realized. If it weren’t for Iruka-sensei and his friends from Konoha 11, Naruto would probably be the village’s enemy or, most likely, dead.

kawaki family
Kawaki with his new family.

Naruto resonates with Kawaki in many ways, and that propels Naruto to help the boy adapt to the “normal” – to offer him the support and home very few people offer to Naruto.

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Episode 193 marks the induction of Kawaki to the Uzumaki family, the adoption of a lost child that was never loved before. After Boruto finally understands his father’s reasons for wanting Kawaki to be good, he reluctantly accepts him. Ultimately, Uzumaki and we, as the fans, officially learn the boy’s name – Kawaki.

In the next episodes, we see how Kawaki is hurt and traumatized by other people. Naruto serves as Kawaki’s caretaker and father figure. Ultimately, he is the father he never had, and for me, these episodes are one of the best ones in the series.

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