30 Most Powerful Superheroes of all Time (RANKED)

30 Most Powerful Superheroes of all Time (RANKED)

A superhero, although not always as interesting and intriguing as a supervillain, is the most important type of character in modern tales of good versus evil. A superhero fights for the side of the good and he (or she) does his best to uphold justice and to defeat the villains. These characters usually embody laudable values and a specific form of idealism that makes them so loveable among fans. Superheroes are the pillars of modern fiction and in today’s article, we have decided to bring you a list of the 30 most powerful superheroes of all time.

Although this list is going to focus primarily on comic book superheroes, we made an effort to consider the bigger picture and to include characters that appeared in other media as well, including but not limited to manga, video games, movies and television shows. The goal was to identify the strongest among them and that is what we did.

Also, this list is going to contain only those characters that can be clearly defined as superheroes throughout the majority of their careers. This means that neutral characters (such as The Presence or The One-Above-All) won’t be included, as well as characters that have had various roles in stories (such as Doctor Manhattan, who was a hero at the beginning of Watchmen but a villain, albeit a more neutral one, in Doomsday Clock), and those that could be better defined as antiheroes than actual heroes (for example Deadpool). Now, let us finally begin!

30 Most Powerful Superheroes

30. Silver Surfer

Real Name: Norrin Radd
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: The Fantastic Four #48 (1966)

Silver Surfer, Norrin Radd’s alter ego, is a fictional comic book character created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1966 and published by the US publishing house Marvel Comics. He made his debut in the series The Fantastic Four #48 in 1966.

Following the cosmic power conferred on him by Galactus, he possesses remarkable strength and endurance and the ability to manipulate matter at will. He has a surfboard that allows him to fly faster than the speed of light and travel through time and between dimensions.

Silver Surfer is presented as an extraterrestrial herald of Galactus, the most powerful devourer of worlds, who took him in exchange for the salvation of his home planet (Zenn-La) and bestowed on him his superpowers, including the silvery skin that makes his body almost invulnerable and the ability to travel at incredible speed in sidereal spaces with the help of an unusual surfboard, which in all comics has always been defined by Norrin himself as “axis”.

Finally on Earth, due to his pity for mankind and his encounter with the blind sculptress Alicia Masters, the Silver Surfer rebelled against his master, allying himself with the Fantastic Four in an attempt to defeat him. Galactus therefore decided to exile him on the planet that he had helped to save.

Another peculiarity of the character is his surfboard, which always reaches him, unless it is blocked by supernatural forces. The cosmic power allows him to heal, act on mechanisms and fire very strong shots of energy: moreover he does not seem to need to breathe, feed or warm up.

Curiously he can be knocked out by gas, energy discharges or brute force. Over time, however, his powers have been deepened and revised, and the Surfer has been shown to be a very skilled being, with complete control of matter, also able to transform his axis into a globe, as happened in the stories of the Revival of the Fantastic Four, or how to turn a toaster into gold.

29. Captain Marvel

Real Name: Carol Susan Jane Danvers
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Roy Thomas, Gene Colan
Debut: Marvel Super-Heroes #13 (1968)

Carol Susan Jane Danvers is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel. Carol Danvers is best known as the current Captain Marvel, although she has a much longer history within the Marvel universe. She was created by Roy Thomas and Gene Colan.

The character of Carol Danvers debuted in Marvel Super-Heroes #13 (1968) as an officer of the United States Air Force. She was a colleague of Dr. Walter Lawson, the human alias of Mar-Vell, the first Captain Marvel. The first major event of her history happened when she was hurt in an explosion of a Kree device; Mar-Vell saved her life, but she was seriously injured. During the explosion, her DNA got mixed with Mar-Vell’s, which gave her superhuman abilities.

Carol Danvers returned during the 1970s with her superhuman abilities as the superhero Ms. Marvel, debuting in the comic Ms. Marvel #1 (1977). She was a very progressive character at the time and has since become one of the foremost female superheroes in the Marvel universe.

Carol Danvers worked with the Avengers and has appeared in titles involving other characters. She herself has changed superhero identities again in 1982 (when she became Binary) and in 1998 (when she became Warbird), before finally becoming Captain Marvel in 2012’s Avenging Spider-Man #9 (2012).

28. Shazam

Real Name: William Joseph “Billy” Batson
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Bill Parker, C. C. Beck
Debut: Whiz Comics #2 (1939)

Shazam, also known by his official name Captain Marvel, is a fictional superhero appearing in stories published by DC Comics. He made his debut in 1939 in Whiz Comics #2 and was created by Bill Parker and C.C. Beck. Shazam is the alter ego of orphan Billy Batson, who, when uttering the phrase “Shazam!”, becomes the superhero Captain Marvel.

Billy Batson was orphaned at a young age after his parents, C.C. and Marilyn Batson died. After his parents passed away, Billy became cold and cruel to most people. Becoming selfish and heartless, he went from nursing home to nursing home until he ended up in a Philadelphia orphanage.

At the age of fifteen, Billy was placed in the care of Victor and Rosa Vasquez, both former foster children themselves who had already adopted a number of children. Billy moved into the Vazquezes’ home, where he met his new foster siblings Mary, Freddy, Eugene, Pedro and Darla. Billy refused to bond with the other children and refused their attempts to get close to him. The next day, however, Billy stepped in to defend his siblings from bullies who picked them up at school.

That night, he snuck out of the house and was followed by Freddy, and the boys decided to hijack the bullies father’s car. Billy was caught and escaped on a subway at the subway station. The train turned into a gateway to the Rock of Eternity, where Billy met the Wizard. The Wizard searched the boy’s soul and found that he was not perfect.

When he told him, Billy was angry with him immediately for believing that everyone is purely good and error-free. The Wizard accepted Billy’s point of view and looked deeper into his soul. After seeing all the good Billy had done in his life, the wizard gave him his power.

In a word, he could transform himself into the champion Shazam and lead the living lightning. After giving Billy all his power, the Wizard died. And the rest is history. It took some time before Billy Batson got used to his new powers but as soon as he did, he became a very popular superhero; Captain Marvel was a brilliant blend between Billy’s childhood ideals and the responsibility of an adult superhero.

During his adventures, he has fought a large rogues gallery, most of them working in tandem as the Monster Society of Evil, including primary archenemies Doctor Sivana, Black Adam, and Mister Mind.

27. Supergirl

Real Name: Kara Zor-El
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Otto Binder, Al Plastino
Debut: Action Comics #252

The character of Kara Zor-El was introduced to the DC Comics continuity in the 1959 comic book Action Comics #252. The story was titled “The Supergirl from Krypton” and was written by Otto Binder, with Al Plastino providing the illustrations.

In 1959, Kara Zor-El debuted in Action Comics #252. She was introduced as Superman’s cousin from Argo City, a fragment of Krypton that survived destruction. Later, though, Argo City was destroyed by a meteor shower, but before that happened – Kara’s parents sent her to Earth to be raised by her cousin, Kal-El. Sounds familiar? It’s because it is – the writers used the same story for Superman and Supergirl, changing only the circumstances, but just slightly.

While on Earth, Kara Zor-El took the name Linda Lee and became an orphan, before eventually being adopted by Fred and Edna Danvers, becoming “Linda Lee Danvers”. Yes, you read that correctly – Supergirl’s adoptive family has the same last name as Carol Danvers, the best-known Captain Marvel!

For years, Superman used his cousin as a secret weapon, before eventually introducing her to the world. Her character continued to develop during the 60s and the 70s, becoming more and more important as DC developed its female characters.

She has had a lot of roles during the years and at one point, her story became very confusing so the editors decided to kill her off. This happened in Crisis on Infinite Earths, a major DC event from 1985.She was reintroduced in Superman/Batman #8 (2004), in a story that payed hommage to her original 1959 debut. 

26. Rorschach

Real Name: Walter Joseph Kovacs
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons
Debut: Watchmen #1 (1986)

Rorschach is a fictional character created by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons for the Watchmen comic book, published by DC Comics between 1986 and 1987. Wearing a mask inspired by the inkblot from the Rorschach test, which the character considers his true face, he continues his lonely battle against crime long after the vigilantes become illegal, being the only one to remain active without being a government employee.

Walter Joseph Kovacs was raised by his mother, a debt-ridden prostitute who violently discharged her frustrations onto her son. After reacting in an almost animalistic way to the abuses of some older boys, Walter is entrusted to an institution. After a few years, apparently improved, he leaves the institute and finds a job in a clothes shop. He decides to become a masked vigilante after the killing of Kitty Genovese, a client, brutally murdered despite the presence of numerous people, none of whom decides to intervene.

Early in his vigilante career, Kovacs actively collaborates with other superheroes, most notably the second Nite Owl, fighting street gangs and arresting several criminal bosses. However, at the time, Kovacs had not yet taken on that violent and disturbed personality that will characterize him in the period in which Watchmen is set; Rorschach, looking back on that period, defines himself as “Kovacs pretending to be Rorschach”.

The complete transformation from Walter Kovacs into Rorschach takes place in 1975, while he deals with the case of a child, kidnapped because she is mistakenly believed to be the daughter of pharmaceutical magnates. Kovacs will discover that the little girl was killed and torn to pieces by her kidnapper, who then got rid of her body by feeding it to German shepherds.

Kovacs horribly kills the culprit, but from that moment on, his psyche undergoes a violent change: his methods become brutal, his way of speaking tight and hasty and he himself tends to act in solitude and write a diary with his own thoughts and reflections. When he operates under the identity of Walter Kovacs, he turns into a fanatic obsessed with the end of the world and is an avid reader of the New Frontiersman, an anti-Communist right-wing periodical that looks favorably on violent vigilantes.

After the Keene Decree of August 3, 1977, which makes the activity of vigilantes illegal, Rorschach refuses to withdraw or to make his identity public. The list of his crimes gets longer and he becomes a wanted man.

At the beginning of Watchmen, Rorschach learns of Edward Blake’s death and manages to discover that he was secretly the Comedian. He then discovers a secret plan to murder masked heroes, and his suspicions are strengthened after the escape of Dr. Manhattan and the attempted assassination of Adrian Veidt.

Trapped and captured by the police thanks to Veidt, Rorschach is freed by the second Nite Owl and the second Silk Spectre. Once he discovers the plan to avoid a war between the United States of America and the USSR by having millions of New Yorkers killed by a fake alien creature, which Veidt had just carried out, he refuses to hide the truth.

For this reason he will be killed by Dr. Manhattan. However, his diary, sent to the editorial team of the New Frontiersman, could reveal the secret to the world and tear Veidt’s perfect plan to pieces.

25. Captain America

Real Name: Steven Rogers
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Joe Simon, Jack Kirby
Debut: Captain America Comics #1 (1941)

Captain America, whose real name is Steven Rogers, is a fictional comic book character created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby in 1941 for Timely Comics, which later became Marvel Comics.

During the Second World War, the young Steve Rogers wanted to enlist to serve his homeland in war. Discarded on the draft visit due to his frail physique, he was allowed to participate in a secret experiment called “Project: Rebirth”, aimed at creating an army of super soldiers. Through a chemical preparation made by Dr. Abraham Erskine, Rogers’ physical and mental condition was enormously developed.

Steve Rogers remained the only person to take advantage of the benefits of the super soldier serum, thus becoming a unique specimen. Enlisted for secret missions beyond enemy lines, the meek Steve Rogers thus became Captain America, wearing a stars and stripes costume that explicitly resembled the American flag.

Towards the end of the war, Cap and Bucky travel to Great Britain to stop Baron Zemo, a Nazi scientist who is there with the task of bombing London by a V2; the two heroes are unable to prevent it from taking off but launch in pursuit: the plane explodes and Cap crashes into the sea trying to divert its course, while Bucky dies in the explosion.

In the sixties Steve Rogers comes back to life thanks to the involuntary help of Namor who goes to the Arctic Ocean, where he finds Eskimos bowing in front of a block of ice, believing it to be a totem pole. The block begins to thaw under the effect of the hot currents, revealing a man inside in a state of suspended animation. Giant-Man manages to grab the man and drag him into the Avengers submarine, where they identify him as Captain America. Steve Rogers thus becomes part of the group of heroes, of which he becomes one of the recognized leaders.

24. Black Panther

Real Name: T’CHalla
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: Fantastic Four #52 (1966)

Black Panther is a fictional superhero appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. He was created by Marvel legends Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, debuting in 1966’s Fantastic Four #52. Despite being a regular with Marvel, Black Panther has only recently become as popular as some other big superhero names like Captain America, Iron Man or Thor.

Black Panther is actually the alter ego of T’Challa, the king and protector of the fictional African country of Wakanda. Black Panther is actually a hereditary title that is passed on to Wakandan rulers, but they have to prove themselves beforehand.

Interestingly enough, although the character debuted under the name Black Panther before the Black Panther Party was actually founded (October, 1966), Marvel’s editors tried to change his name to Black Leopard during the ’70s in order to avoid a connection with the BPP, but the new name was never accepted so they quickly “revived” Black Panther.

As a child, T’Challa’s father, T’Chaka, was killed by villain Ulysses Klaw, leaving the underage prince as the successor of the throne. His uncle was regent until he became of age. T’Challa was obsessed with avenging his father and killing Klaw, which has driven a lot of his initial plots. But he was also a very successful ruler, uniting the majority of Wakandan tribes under his rule.

A lot of his initial stories focused on him wanting to kill Klaw. As part of his training, he even summoned the Fantastic Four in Wakanda and fought them one by one to prepare for Klaw; he would later explain his motives and befriended the group. This all happened in his debut appearance. Later on, Black Panther became part of the Avengers and the authors further developed his story.

An important moment was his fight against the usurper Killmonger, whom he defeated initially, before losing later on but Killmonger never actually usurped the throne because he fell into a coma after consuming a herb that was toxic for anyone outside the royal bloodline. T’Challa spared his life afterward, opting not to kill him.

23. Monkey D. Luffy

Real Name: Monkey D. Luffy
Franchise: One Piece
Created By: Eiichirō Oda
Debut: One Piece chapter 1 (1997)

Monkey D. Luffy, also known as “Straw Hat Luffy” or simply “Straw Hat,” is the protagonist of the One Piece manga and anime series. He is the organizer and captain of the famed and powerful Straw Hat Pirates, as well as one of their most skilled warriors. 

His lifetime ambition is to discover the mythical treasure left behind by the late Gol D. Roger and become the Pirate King. Being Pirate King, he claims, entails enjoying the most independence in the world.

Luffy is the son of the Revolutionary chief Monkey D. Dragon and the grandfather of the Marine hero Monkey D. Garp, and he is one of the few people in the world who carries the Will of D. He was born in Foosha Village.

Luffy has fought a variety of global forces, beginning with the most powerful pirates in the East Blue, and has come out on top in the bulk of these fights. Luffy’s achievements and legacy have earned him the title of “Dangerous Future Element,” enraging Fleet Admiral Sakazuki, the Marine Headquarters, and even the World Government. 

He also has a knack for recruiting fans, and he has been unwittingly called the group’s chief. The press has dubbed him the “Fifth Emperor of the Sea” after learning of this and his adventures against the Big Mom Pirates, but several public figures believe this is exaggerated.

Luffy’s playful nature and inquisitive nature make him a daily delight to watch. Although this can make him seem childish at times, he also has silent moments of surprising maturity and respect that demonstrate that he has plenty of souls even without the afro.

22. Iron Man

Real Name: Anthony Edward “Tony” Stark
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, Don Heck, Jack Kirby
Debut: Tales of Suspense #39 (1963)

Iron Man is the superhero alter ego of one Anthony Edward “Tony” Stark, American billionaire, playboy, and inventor. Iron Man was collectively created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, Don Heck, and Jack Kirby in 1963, debuting in the comic book Tales of Suspense #39. Iron Man is a superhero from the Marvel fictional universe, known also as one of the first and best-known members of the Avengers.

Tony Stark was born as the son of industrialist Howard Stark and his wife, Maria. He was a wunderkind, entering MIT at the age of 15 and later receiving a master’s degree in engineering and physics. While he was still young, his parents died in a traffic accident, so Tony inherited his father’s company.

Initially, Iron Man was a way for Marvel to approach Cold War topics, especially the comparison of American, capitalist technology with Soviet, communist worldviews. When the Cold War ended, Iron Man became less of a political character and more of a modern superhero character.

The Iron Man suit was actually an invention of Stark’s, who is a genius engineer and inventor. On one occasion, he was kidnapped and sustained a severe chest injury. The kidnappers wanted him to build a weapon of mass destruction, which he refused and instead built a suit for himself to escape.

Thus, Iron Man was born, but Tony Stark never wanted to stop with the first suit. He has constantly upgraded and improved his suits, creating enhanced versions every now and then.

Tony Stark was initially secretive about his superhero identity, but at one point he decided to go against the general comic book rule that states that the superhero should never reveal his or her name as to spare their family, friends, and others.

Namely, Tony Stark decided to reveal to the whole world – not just Pepper Potts and James Rhodes – that he was actually Iron Man, which was a bold and very important moment in the history of American comics.

21. Aquaman

Real Name: Arthur Curry
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Mort Weisinger, Paul Norris
Debut: More Fun Comics #73 (1941)

Aquaman is the superhero name of Arthur Curry, a fictional superhero appearing in stories published by DC Comics. Aquaman was created by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris, debuting in November 1941 in More Fun Comics #73.

Arthur Curry is the son of a lighthouse worker named Tom Curry and a woman named Atlanna. Arthur demonstrated incredible strength and speed as a teenager, as well as the ability to breathe underwater and talk to fish.

At the time of her death, Atlanna revealed the truth to the boy: she was the Queen of Atlantis in exile, and promised that one day Arthur would become the ruler of the seven seas. His father educated him and taught him how to manage his abilities, which ultimately helped him become a hero named Aquaman.

His origin was changed when the DC Universe was launched. In this iteraton, Orin was born into the royal family of Atlantis. But later it turned out that his father was not the king of Atlantis, but the immortal wizard Atlan.

He foretold a great future for the child and named him Orin in honor of his ancestor, promising to be the father of another child, because two brothers must always fight for the future of Atlantis. Travis immediately learned that the child was not his, by the color of his hair (Orin was blond), which indicated that he could carry the Curse of Cordaks.

It was announced that the Queen had a miscarriage, and the child was left on the Merciful Reef. But thanks to his ability to communicate with the inhabitants of the sea, the child was raised by dolphins.

His adoptive mother, Porm, gave him the name Swimmer, although Orin left the family when his adoptive brother, Drina, was killed by a fisherman. His next encounter with humanity occurred when a lighthouse worker, Tom Curry, took him into his care, giving him the name Arthur Curry before he died. Spending time in Alaska, Arthur fell in love with an Eskimo girl named Kako. She was pregnant, but Arthur didn’t know it, because the demon Nulayuk forced him to leave Alaska.

When he returned to Atlantis, Arthur was sentenced to hard labor in a prison called the Aquarium. He had a good relationship with former professor Valko, who taught him Atlantic; at this time he learns that his biological mother is dead. The first superhero Orin met was Flash. He called Curry Aquaman during a press conference on the shores of the Crescent.

Upon his next return home, Orin learns that Professor Valko led the uprising and demanded his legal right to the throne of Atlantis. This was allegedly changed during the Crisis on Infinite Earths event, which was revealed during a conversation with Jackson Hyde and shown in The Brighter Day, that Arthur was the son of Atlanna and Tom Curry again.

20. Wolverine

Real Name: James Howlett / Logan
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Roy Thomas, Len Wein, John Romita Sr.
Debut: The Incredible Hulk #180 (1974)

Wolverine is the superhero/mutant name of one James Howlett, a fictional superhero/antihero appearing in Marvel’s X-Men franchise. Wolverine is also know as Logan and Weapon X.

He was created by Roy Tomas, Len Wein and John Romita Sr. and made his first full appearance in The Incredible Hulk #181 (1974), after having had a cameo appearance in the preceding issue of the same comic.

Wolverine is a typical antihero, although most incarnations show him as being a superhero and a member of the X-Men, despite him having a very unorthodox approach to fighting crime and the status of mutants in the world.

Wolverine’s origin story involves a lot of blood and tragedy. He was born as James Howlett in Canada during the 1880s, as the son of John and Elizabeth Howlett; he was actually the illegitimate son of the groundskeeper Thomas Logan, which explains one of his aliases.

Although his creators weren’t sure on which origin story to pick for him, the contemporary Marvel canon states that Wolverine first manifested his powers when bone claws appeared from his hands after his father had killed John Howlett as a retaliation for the latter sending him away after he had been falsely accused of rape. He used the claws to kill Thomas Logan, avenging John Howlett’s death, but now knowing that he was actually murdering his own father.

He then became a soldier and mercenary, fighting in both World Wars and living a solitary life in between. He was recruited as a member of the infamous Team X and given false memory implants.

He managed to break free from the fabricated reality, but was ultimately kidnapped and turned into a test subject for the Weapon X project. During this captivity, adamantium was inserted into his body, which augmented his powers and made him the famous mutant he is today. He managed to escape and regain his humanity with the help of some friends. Later on, he was recruited by Professor X as a member of the X-Men and the rest is – history.

19. Martian Manhunter

Real Name: J’onn J’onzz
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Joseph Samachson, Joe Certa
Debut: Detective Comics #225 (1955)

J’onn J’onnz was accidentally teleported to Earth by human scientist Dr. Erdel. Stranded on Earth and unable to return, J’onn J’onnz used his superpowers to make himself look human and eventually assumed the identity of a police officer named John Jones, who had been murdered by the Mafia.

From then on, he used his extraterrestrial powers to help the inhabitants of his new planet. During the Silver Age, he also fought crime in his ancestral looks, wearing a blue cape and a red crossed ribbon on his chest. In later comics, J’onn J’onzz was portrayed as one of the last two survivors of his kind.

The inhabitants of Mars – who were called Ma’aleca’andra in their language, based on a story by C. S. Lewis – lived in a peaceful society of poets, priests and magicians for millennia. This utopia was free from war and resentment because each Martian could read the other’s mind. J’onn Jonzz was then a happily married scientist and father, the husband of M’yri’ah and father of K’hym, a girl.

Only one Martian had no telepathic abilities, J’onn’s brother Ma’alefa’ak. Out of envy and anger, he let H’ronmeer’s disease plague the Martians; it was a disease that was telepathically transmitted and that burned the infected. The entire Martian race was exterminated, except for J’onn Jonnz, who believed he had killed his brother after a long battle.

From then on, the story began again with the earlier comics, where J’onn J’onnz was teleported to Earth. When Earth was attacked by various competing aliens in 1962, trying to see who could conquer the planet first, the Martian Manhunter teamed up with Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Barry Allen as Flash, Hal Jordan as Green Lantern, and Aquaman to form the Justice League.

18. Professor X

Real Name: Charles Francis Xavier
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: The X-Men #1 (1963)

Professor X, whose real name is Charles Francis Xavier, is a comic book character created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby in 1963 for Marvel Comics. He is the founder of the X-Men group, which has as its principle the peaceful existence between mutants and humans.

He is a powerful telepath who can read, control and influence human minds and create illusions. A natural genius, he is also an authority on genetics, mutations and psychic powers. Charles Francis Xavier is the son of nuclear physicist Brian Xavier and Sharon Xavier. The radiation absorbed by his father will cause Charles to find himself with enormous mutant powers.

Also gifted with an intelligence above the norm, Charles will quickly become a student and a top-level athlete, only to retire from competition believing that his mutant power gives him an advantage over ordinary humans. After her husband’s death, Sharon will remarry Kurt Marko, her colleague, who will take with him her son, Cain.

Extremely jealous and resentful towards Charles, Cain will despise his stepbrother for years, believing that his father loves him more. After the death of Kurt, who sacrifices himself to save his two sons from a fire in his laboratory, Cain will distance himself even further from his stepbrother, later becoming the mystical criminal known as the Juggernaut.

Xavier was later rendered paraplegic by an accident, which was later revealed to be caused by the alien supervillain Lucifer. He graduated from the University of Oxford. He helped Tad Carter escape from people who wanted to kill him and invited him to join him.

He then decided to establish a school for gifted young people, an institute where he taught young and frightened mutants to understand their true nature and to learn to use their powers wisely.

In order to counter the criminal plans of Dr. Schmidt, a mutant with the ambition to dominate the world by starting World War III, and who, during WWII worked alongside the Nazis, under whose orders he found and tortured the young Magneto, Xavier formed the X-Men, a group formed by his students to counter threats from mutants with criminal intentions.

17. Batman

Real Name: Bruce Wayne
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Bob Kane, Bill Finger
Debut: Detective Comics #27 (1939)

Batman is the secret superhero alter ego of Bruce Wayne, a billionaire playboy based in Gotham City. Bruce Wayne is the owner of Wayne Enterprises, a successful company based in Gotham City and is the heir of the Wayne estate.

He lives alone in Wayne Manor, on the outskirts of Gotham, with his butler and trusted friend, Alfred Pennyworth. Wayne’s life has been defined by a tragedy he had witnessed as a child. Namely, one night Bruce went to the movies with his parents, Thomas and Martha Wayne.

His father decided to take a shortcut through an alley after exiting the theatre, but he did not know that an unknown mugger was standing there, waiting for his prey. The mugger attacked and ultimately killed both Thomas and Martha Wayne, but spared the life of young Bruce, who was left to the care of Alfred Pennyworth.

The mystery of his parents’ murder played an important role in Bruce Wayne’s life and was a key fact in his decision to become the vigilante Batman. Believing that criminals are a “a cowardly and superstitious lot“, Bruce Wayne decided to put on Batman’s cowl, taking inspiration for the name and the design from a childhood experience with bats.

Frank Miller’s important Batman: Year One comic book depicts Batman’s beginnings as a vigilante in Gotham and since that moment, he has become a symbol of Gotham City and a name used with fear among the city’s criminals. While fighting regular villains and members of his Rogue’s Gallery, Batman has also tried to solve the murder of his parents, ultimately finding out that they were killed by a street criminal named Joe Chill. T

he Batman mythos has grown with time and with it also Batman, who has evolved from a solitary vigilante to the leader of the Batman family (or Batfamily), which includes several other superheroes like Batgirl, Batwoman, former Robins Nightwing, Red Robin, Spoiler and others. Currently, Batman is aided by his son Damian Wayne (his mother is Talia al-Ghul, Ra’s al-Ghul’s daughter), who is also the fifth and incumbent Robin.

16. Jean Grey

Real Name: Jean Elaine Grey
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: The X-Men #1 (1963)

Jean Grey is a comic book character created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, appearing in stories published by Marvel Comics; she debuted in The X-Men #1 (1963). She is an omega-level mutant belonging to the X-Men group, of which she was a founding member, later co-founding X-Factor.

During Marvel’s editorial history, Jean Grey had her name changed name several times, starting with Marvel Girl and then moving on to Phoenix, which later became the Dark Phoenix after the cosmic entity of the same name took her identity and her place in the X-Men, turning her evil.

Finally Jean, after her death and conjunction with the cosmic incubation site of the Phoenix, was called White Phoenix of the Crown and in this role she saved and rewrote the history of the Earth for one last time.

Jean is the character who has the highest number of deaths and rebirths in various ways in the history of the mutant group; another characteristic is that of being an important reference figure in the life of all those who have been close to her: wife and first love of Cyclops, “daughter” and disciple of Charles Xavier, main sentimental interest of Wolverine, “sister” and best friend of Storm, mother (actual or adoptive) of Rachel Summers, Cable and Nate Gray, and mentor of numerous other young mutants.

She was born in Annadale-on-Hudson, New York, to John and Elaine Grey. Like all mutants, Jean’s powers appeared during adolescence, although in her case in an explosive way: at the age of ten, in fact, she witnessed the death of her best friend, Annie Richardson, who was run over by a car and died in his arms.

Jean had trouble coping with all the pain and suffering caused by her friend’s death and was traumatized by this set of emotions, as well as by her nascent powers, which is why she was sent for treatment to Professor Xavier, who was tasked with helping her control her powers. During one of their sessions with Cerebro, Jean was able to hear, inside the orphanage in which he was housed, a young and desperate Scott Summers and, through her powers, she touched his mind in order to leave a memory.

Realizing that the young woman would not be able to handle the high potential of her mutation, Xavier telepathically blocked her powers and allowed them to develop naturally. At the age of thirteen, Jean developed good telekinetic control and in adolescence she was sent to Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters, thus entering the first X-Men lineup.

She was the only girl in the group and assumed the code name of Marvel Girl. During her first mission, she clashed with the mutant Magneto and later with increasingly powerful enemies such as the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants, the Juggernaut and the Sentinels. Leaving the Xavier School briefly, Jean attended Metro College only to return to the X-Men and begin a relationship with Scott.

15. Scarlet Witch

Real Name: Wanda Maximoff
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: The X-Men #4 (1964)

Scarlet Witch is the superhero name of Wanda Marya Maximoff, a fictional superhero from the Marvel Universe. She was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, debuting in The X-Men #4 (1964).

She was initially depicted as a mutant, but her story was recently retconned and she became a mutated human through genetic experimentation.

Scarlet Witch was initially a supervillain along with her twin brother Quicksilver (Pietro Maximoff) and one of the founding members of the Brotherhood of Mutants, a villainous group led by Magneto.

In most of the early depictions, she was portrayed as a mutant, and, for much of the character’s history, was considered the daughter of the mutant Magneto and the half-sister of Polaris. This was later retconned.

The Scarlet Witch possesses abilities to alter reality in unspecified ways and is a powerful sorceress. Later on, though, the mutant version of the Scarlet Witch is depicted as a superheroine and a regular member of the Avengers superhero team.

She also becomes the wife of fellow superhero and teammate Vision, with whom she has two sons, Thomas and William. The character’s in-universe backstory and parentage have been changed more than once throughout the years.

During the 1970s, Pietro and Wanda have been depicted as the children of the superhero Whizzer (this is why, at one point, she has been known as Wanda Frank), but a 1980s retcon revealed the Scarlet Witch and Quicksilver are the unknown offspring of supervillain Magneto.

They were born to Magneto’s estranged wife in Transia, and were left in the care of their adoptive Romani parents.

Still, during the 2010s, their story was once again retconned, and it was revealed that Quicksilver and she are not mutants but were kidnapped and used as subjects of genetic experimentation by the High Evolutionary, then misled to believe Magneto was their father.

14. Hal Jordan (Green Lantern)

Real Name: Hal Jordan
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: John Broome, Gil Kane
Debut: Showcase #22 (1959)

Hal Jordan, an aircraft test driver for Ferris Aircraft, is forced to make a crash landing while testing an aircraft. At the same time, the same thing happens to a dying alien. The alien is a Green Lantern and, considering the severity of his injuries, orders his ring to look for someone who can replace him.

The ring of Abin Sur probes the surrounding terrain and finds the qualities of honesty, courage, and great willpower precisely in Hal Jordan, considered by all to be a reckless and unreliable man who risks throwing away his own life.

However, the Ring calls him to itself, near the body of Abin Sur, and informs him of the existence of a space police force that has the task of maintaining peace in the Universe, at the center of which is the planet Oa, by choice of the Guardians of the Universe, a race of blue dwarves, controllers of the green energy contained in the Ring, themselves.

The Guardians divided the Universe into sectors (3600), placing Oa in the center and making sure that each sector was controlled by an intelligent being of proven honesty and courage, in order to give it a ring of power like that of Abin Sur and an oath of fidelity, which serves to recharge the ring every 24 hours.

The only limitation is the color yellow, as the Ring can do nothing against objects of that color. Informed of these facts, Hal agrees to become the new protector of the Earth, located in sector 2814, irreversibly changing his life and that of his loved ones, among which is his beloved Carol Ferris; she would later become Star Sapphire, a future opponent of Green Lantern.

Among his important enemies are the telepath Hector Hammond, his archenemy, the former Green Lantern Sinestro, and the Red Lantern Atrocitus.

13. Doctor Strange

Real Name: Stephen Vincent Strange
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Steve Ditko
Debut: Strange Tales #110 (1963)

Doctor Stephen Vincent Strange, better known as Doctor Strange, is a fictional superhero and surgeon who appears in American comics published by Marvel Comics. Created by artist Steve Ditko and writer Stan Lee, the character first appeared in Strange Tales #110 (July 1963).

In most stories, Doctor Strange serves as the Sorcerer Supreme, Earth’s primary protector against magical and mystical threats.

Inspired by stories of black magic and Chandu the Magician, Strange was created during the Silver Age of Comic Books to bring a different kind of character and subjects to Marvel Comics. The character’s origin story relates that he was once a skilled and brilliant, but selfish surgeon.

After a car accident severely damages his hands and hampers his ability to perform surgery, he seeks a way to repair them by meeting the Elder. After becoming one of the Sorcerer Supreme’s students, he becomes a practitioner of both mystical and martial arts, studying in the mountains of Asia.

Aside from knowing many powerful spells, he has a magical suit that contains two mystical and magical objects: the Cloak of Levitation and the Eye of Agamotto, both of which grant him additional powers.

During his adventures, Strange can count on the assistance of his friend and servant, Wong, and a wide variety of mystical objects.

He takes up residence in a mansion called the Sanctum Sanctorum, located in New York City. Later, Strange himself becomes the Sorcerer Supreme.

12. Spider-Man

Real Name: Peter Parker
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Steve Ditko
Debut: Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962)

Spider-Man is the superhero alter-ego of Peter Parker, a character appearing in comic books published by Marvel Comics. He is a superhero from New York City and one of the most popular comic book characters in history.

He was created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, making his debut in Amazing Fantasy #15 (1962). Since then, Spider-Man has appeared in numerous solo volumes, but also as part of other series and teams, most notably the Avengers.

Although not the only one to don the costume of Spider-Man – the most notable successors being Miles Morales and Doctor Octopus himself – Peter Parker is definitely the most famous Spider-Man, which is why we are going to talk about him in this article.

Peter Parker was born in New York to Richard and Mary Parker, but was raised by his uncle Ben and aunt May Parker, due to his parents dying in a plane crash. The comic books dealt a lot with the issues of adolescence, growing up and Peter’s constant financial struggles.

The life of an average teenager changed when he was accidentally bit by a radioactive spider, which gave him superhuman abilities, including, but not limited to shooting a web from his body or climbing walls.

Realizing that he has become a superhero of sorts, Peter Parker designed a suit for himself and became Spider-Man, your friendly neighborhood superhero.

Spider-Man mostly operates out of Queens and, along with fighting regular criminals, he battles against a gallery of famous rogues including Vulture, Scorpion, Rhino, Lizard, Mr. Negative, Venom, Green Goblin and his nemesis, Doctor Octopus.

Spider-Man also has to battle against the negative propaganda advocated publicly by J. Johan Jameson, the publisher of the Daily Bugle, who leads an active smear campaign against Spider-Man, despite all the good he does for the city.

Ironically, it is J. Jonah Jameson who employs Peter Parker, not knowing his superhero identity, as a photojournalist for the Bugle; Parker made a career by constantly bringing in great photographs of Spider-Man.

Peter Parker’s private life is also examined in the comics, especially the impact of Uncle Ben’s death and his love relationships with Mary Jane Watson and Gwen Stacy. Usually a standalone hero, Spider-Man has been a member of the Avengers since the 2010s.

Spider-Man’s membership (or rather his failed attempts to join the group before the 2010s) in the team was a running gag in the comics, as well as his relationship and friendship with Deadpool.

11. Ichigo Kurosaki

Real Name: Ichigo Kurosaki
Franchise: Bleach
Created By: Tite Kubo
Debut: Bleach chapter 1 (2001)

Ichigo Kurosaki is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the manga Bleach, as well as the anime adaptation of the same name. He was created by Tite Kubo and is a 17-year old high-school student who can see ghosts.

After an unfortunate incident, a Soul Reaper named Rukia Kuchiki transfers her powers to him so he can save his family, after which he becomes a Soul Reaper himself. Ichigo meets Rukia Kuchiki during an attack from a Hollow. After Rukia is injured, she must transfer her powers to Ichigo so that he can defeat the Hollow and save his family’s lives.

After the Hollow is defeated, it turns out that Ichigo has taken over all of Rukia’s spiritual power and must remain in the real world until her powers return. In the meantime, Ichigo is completing her Shinigami duties.

Because Ichigo exposes his friends to his spiritual power, they also develop powers. When Rukia is arrested and taken to Soul Society awaiting her execution, Ichigo risks everything to save Rukia. In Soul Society he fights with several high-ranking Shinigamis. With the help of some Shinigami, he manages to save Rukia, but she still manages to get into the hands of Sosuke Aizen.

Aizen manages to get the Hōgyoku out of her body, but his plan to kill Rukia is prevented, although he still manages to flee with his henchmen. After this, Ichigo has become temporary Shinigami and is allowed to return to the real world with his friends.

Using the Hōgyoku, Aizen has created an army that he sends to the real world where they attack Ichigo and his friends. During the battle, Orihime Inoue is kidnapped by the Arrancar; Ichigo and his friends go to Hueco Mundo to save her.

They do find her, but before they leave, Orihime is captured again and Aizen leaves. Ichigo then goes to Aizen’s throne room and fights with Ulquiorra Cifer, the Quatro Espada, and defeats him when his inner Hollow takes over his body. Afterward, Ichigo leaves back to Karakura Town to stop Aizen.

After the war with Aizen, Ichigo encounters a new enemy who is part of Quincy’s rebellious army. During the second invasion by the Wandenreich, Ichigo and his friends confront Yhwach at the Soul King’s Palace.

During the prolonged fight that followed, Ichigo is defeated by Yhwach, but Tsukishima and Orihime’s combined efforts fixed his broken Tensa Zangetsu, allowing him to pursue Yhwach. Together with Renji and Aizen, Ichigo faces Yhwach once again and finally kills the Quincy.

10. Naruto Uzumaki

Real Name: Naruto Uzumaki
Franchise: Naruto
Created By: Masashi Kishimoto
Debut: Naruto chapter 1: Uzumaki Naruto! (1999)

Naruto Uzumaki is the principal and titular protagonist of the anime and manga Naruto, created by Masashi Kishimoto. He is a young ninja from the fictional village of Konohagakure.

The villagers ridicule Naruto on account of the Nine-Tailed Demon Fox—a malevolent creature that attacked Konohagakure during its history—that was sealed away in Naruto’s body. Despite being ridiculed and ostracised, he aspires to become his village’s leader, the Hokage.

He is carefree, optimistic and boisterous (sometimes described as “simple and stupid”), which enables him to befriend other Konohagakure ninja, as well as ninja from other nearby villages.

Naruto appears in the series’ films and in other media related to the franchise, including video games and original video animations (OVA), as well as the sequel Boruto: Naruto Next Generations, where his son, Boruto Uzumaki, is the protagonist.

9. Wonder Woman

Real Name: Princess Diana of Themyscira / Diana Prince
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: William Moulton Marston, H. G. Peter, Elizabeth Holloway Marston
Debut: All Star Comics #8 (1941)

Wonder Woman is a fictional superheroine appearing as one of the major characters in the DC Comics fictional universe. She debuted in Sensation Comics #1 in 1942 and was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston and illustrator H.G. Peter, who is usually not credited as her creator.

Her real name is Diana, which accounts for her civilian name – Diana Prince. Wonder Woman was born in the fictional island nation of Themyscira as Princess Diana of Themyscira. Dina is an Amazon warrior and has been trained in the way of the Amazons ever since she was a child.

Initially, her origin story included a clay statue made by the Amazon queen, Hippolyta, which was later granted life and several superpowers by the Greek gods (the so-called Old Gods). Newer origin stories retconned this and made Diana the daughter of Zeus and Queen Hippolyta.

Wonder Woman is known as one of DC Comics’ most powerful superheroes ever. She was trained by the Amazons and she also possesses some divine powers, along with specific magical artifacts like the Lasso of Truth.

Wonder Woman was granted passage out of Themyscira and into “Man’s World” when she had to accompany U.S. pilot Steve Trevor back to his home. Steve Trevor would later become a crucial part of Wonder Woman’s story.

Deciding to stay in “Man’s World”, Wonder Woman took on the civilian name Diana Prince, while secretly working as a superheroine and a member of the Justice League. During the years, she has managed to “accumulate” a fairly large and colorful gallery of rogues, which includes names such as Ares, Cheetah, Doctor Poison, Circe, Doctor Psycho, and Giganta, along with more recent adversaries such as Veronica Cale and the First Born.

Today, Wonder Woman is one of the most important members of the Justice League but also a standalone heroine, a very important factor history-wise, especially given the fact that she was one of DC Comics’ major characters in an area where female, characters weren’t. She has certainly helped shape modern DC Comics.

8. Thor

Real Name: Thor Odinson
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, Jack Kirby
Debut: Journey into Mystery #83 (1962)

Thor Odinson is a fictional superhero appearing in comics published by Marvel. He was created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, and Jack Kirby and was inspired by the Norse god Thore, with whom he shares most of his traits.

He made his debut in the comic book Journey into Mystery #83 (1962) and has since become an essential name for Marvel Comics, being the center of several stand-alone series and part of several superhero groups and series.

Thor was initially created by Kirby for DC Comics back in the fifties, but the character never achieved any sort of prominence, which is why Kirby co-created another version for Marvel. Thor is the son of Odin, the mighty All-Father and one of the most powerful characters in the Marvel universe.

He is the Asgardian God of Thunder and is the carrier of the legendary hammer Mjolnir. Being designated as Odin’s “heir”, Thos has tested himself on numerous occasions by fighting strong enemies and doing dangerous tasks, just to prove his worth both to himself and to his father.

He had a strong rivalry with his adoptive brother, Loki. While being an important character in Marvel’s cosmic stories, Thor is also very important for Earth, which he regularly protects. While on Earth, he usually passes himself off as Donald Blake, M.D.

Thor has had a relationship with human Jane Foster, who was depicted as Dr. Blake’s nurse in the comics; Jane Foster even became Thor at one point in the series. He is also a member of the Avengers and has saved Earth on numerous occasions.

7. Hulk

Real Name: Bruce Banner
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: The Incredible Hulk #1 (1962)

The Hulk is a fictional superhero appearing in stories published by Marvel Comics. Hulk is the alter ego of physicist Bruce Banner, who is a regular human, without any superhuman abilities. Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, the character debuted in The Incredible Hulk #1 (1962) and is today regarded as one of Marvel’s strongest characters.

Dr. Robert Bruce Banner is a genius physicist, but a physically weak, socially withdrawn, and emotionally reserved human. During the experimental detonation of a gamma bomb, Banner saves teenager Rick Jones who has driven onto the testing field; Banner pushes Jones into a trench to save him, but is hit with the blast, absorbing massive amounts of gamma radiation.

He awakens later seemingly unharmed by the incident, but that night transforms into a lumbering grey (yes, he was initially grey before having been recolored) form. A pursuing soldier named the creature a “hulk”. 

Originally, it was believed that Banner’s transformations into the Hulk were caused by sunset and undone at sunrise, but later, it was discovered to be caused by anger. Banner was, interestingly enough, cured in The Incredible Hulk #4, but chose to restore Hulk’s powers with Banner’s intelligence.

He later became one of the founding members of the Avengers. The Hulk is a green-skinned, hulking and muscular humanoid possessing a vast degree of physical strength. The two exist as separate dissociative personalities in the same body, and (generally) resent each other.

The Hulk’s level of strength is normally conveyed as proportionate to his level of anger. Commonly portrayed as a raging savage, the Hulk has been represented with other personalities based on Banner’s fractured psyche, from a mindless, destructive force, to a brilliant warrior, or genius scientist in his own right.

6. Hercules

Real Name: Hercules
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: Journey into Mystery Annual #1 (1965)

Hercules is a deity and a superhero appearing in stories published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, the fictional character first appeared in the Journey into Mystery Annual #1 (1965).

The character is inspired by his counterpart in Greek mythology, Heracles son of Zeus, but is better known by his Roman name of Hercules. He has been a perennial member of the Avengers and Defenders superhero teams and has starred in three limited series that bore his name.

In 2008, he made his debut in his own series, titled The Incredible Hercules. Presented in the comics as a character identical to the mythological figure of ancient Greece, its authors however took liberties with the adventures which are usually attributed to him.

A bon vivant, blunderer and playboy, sometimes also irascible, Hercules is also a good adventure companion. Hercules, as a member of the Olympian gods, is one of the most powerful humanoids to ever set foot on Earth.

He has been seen uprooting a redwood tree with the sheer force of his arms or hurling a spaceship into space. The exact limits of his strength are unknown but, if ancient myths are to be believed, he was able to replace the giant Atlas and support the sky on his shoulders.

Few opponents can stand up to him: only the incredible Hulk and the god Thor have shown themselves capable of competing with him in brute force. He is also a formidable fighter, particularly gifted in unarmed combat. He was also trained in martial arts by Iron Fist.

5. Flash

Real Name: Jay Garrick, Barry Allen, Wally West, Bart Allen
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Gardner Fox, Harry Lampert
Debut: Flash Comics #1 (1940)

Explaining Flash is not as easy because – unlike most other characters on this list – several characters in the history of DC Comics have worn The Flash costume since the character first appeared back in 1940. The character was created by Gardner Fox and Harry Lampert and was the first Speedster (the collective name for characters who can use the power of the speed force) in what was to become a whole “family” of similar characters. Most of them are superheroes, but some (like Reverse Flash) have been villains.

The first Flash was Jay Garrick, a Golden Age character that introduced the Flash to the DC continuity. He became the Flash after a freakish laboratory experiment and decided to use his new skills to fight crime; at the time, he was a college student.

Garrick was Flash initially from 1940 to 1951, then again from 1961 to 2011 and has been a part of the main continuity since 2017, although now very old. Due to the nature of the speed force and its role in balancing out the whole DC Multiverse, his appearances and his role in the main continuity have changed a lot over the years.

The second and undoubtedly the most famous Flash is Barry Allen, the current “main” Flash and the rival of Eobard Thawne, the Reverse Flash. Barry Allen donned the mantle from 1956 do 1985 and has been doing it since his “rebirth” in 2008.

He is a forensic scientist who got his powers after lightning struck his laboratory and the chemicals inside. A very important part of his story is the murder of his mother by Thawne, for which his father was blamed; this is why Allen constantly tries not only to find out the truth, but also to change the past, which would ultimately result in the creation of the Flashpoint universe. He played a major role in most of DC’s universe-wide crossover events.

Barry’s nephew, Wally West, took over the mantle in 1986 and wore it until 2011; he reappeared and has been donning it again since 2016. Wally West took over the mantle of the Flash after Barry Allen died in Crisis on Infinite Earths, after being the original Kid Flash.

He got his powers the same way as his uncle (he is related to Barry’s wife, Iris West) and became his sidekick until he actually replaced him as the Flash. He has been a fan-favorite and is to date the fastest Flash among the group.

The fourth and to date the last person to don the Flash costume is Bart Allen, Barry Allen’s grandson, who was the Flash from 2006 to 2007. He appeared as the superhero Impulse, only to inherit the Kid Flash uniform from Wally West, before ultimately becoming The Flash.

He is actually from the 30th century and spent most of his career as the sidekick to Wally West, becoming Flash after his death in the Final Crisis event in 2006. His tenure was brief, as Barry Allen soon returned and reclaimed his mantle.

4. Odin

Real Name: Odin Borson
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: Journey into Mystery #86 (1962)

Odin is the result of the union between an early Asgardian, Bor, and an ice giant, Bestla. The couple had two more sons, Vili and Ve.

He claims to be at the origin of the human race because he found the world too empty, but his father disagreed with him and created all kinds of plagues to destroy mankind. During an attack by the ice giants, Bor was trapped and turned into the snow by an adult Loki from the future.

Odin and his two brothers then took the lead of Asgard. They later confronted the demon Surtur and Vili and Ve did not survive, giving Odin their strength before dying which amplified his powers and was the origin of Odinforce.

Later, the only king of Asgard imprisoned Surtur in the center of the Earth after allying with the trolls. Odin fell in love with the Earth goddess Gaea and wanted a son with her who was as powerful on Asgard as he was on Earth.

He built a cave in Norway to give birth to the future God of Thunder, Thor. He took Thor with him to Asgard and his wife Frigga raised him as her son.

3. Son Goku

Real Name: Kakarot  / Son Goku
Franchise: Dragon Ball
Created By: Akira Toriyama
Debut: Dragon Ball chapter #1 (1984)

Son Goku is the protagonist and main hero of the while Dragon Ball franchise. He is based on Sun Wukong, the main character in the classic Chinese novel Journey to the West. Goku first made his debut in Dragon Ball chapter #1, titled Bulma and Son Goku (ブルマと孫悟空 Buruma to Son Gokū) in 1984, as an eccentric, monkey-tailed boy who practices martial arts and possesses superhuman strength.

He meets Bulma and joins her on a journey to find the wish-granting Dragon Balls, which are used to summon the legendary dragon Shenlong. Along the way, he finds new friends who follow him on his journey. Initially believed to have been born on Earth, Goku later learns that he is a member of an extra-terrestrial warrior race called the Saiyans, which is also the reason for his superhuman strength, and that his birth name is Kakarot.

As he grows up, he becomes the Earth’s mightiest warrior and protects his adopted home planet from those who seek to destroy it (there the similarity with Superman). He is able to concentrate his Ki and use it for devastatingly powerful energy-based attacks; the most prominent being his signature Kamehameha, in which Goku launches a blue energy blast from his palms.

Also pure of heart, Goku has frequently granted mercy to his enemies, which has often earned him additional allies in the process (though has also resulted in others taking advantage of his kindness), and he is one of the few who can ride the magic cloud called Kinto’un (筋斗雲, lit. “Somersault Cloud”); this is also an element adapted from the Chinese novel Journey to the West

2. Franklin Richards

Real Name: Franklin Benjamin Richards
Franchise: Marvel Comics
Created By: Stan Lee, Jack Kirby
Debut: Fantastic Four Annual #6 (1968)

Franklin Richards is a superhero appearing in stories published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, the fictional character first appeared in the Fantastic Four Annual #6 (1968). Son of Reed Richards (aka Mr. Fantastic), the leader of the Fantastic Four, and Jane Storm (aka the Invisible Woman), Franklin is typically portrayed as a young child with a budding, albeit inexperienced, superheritage.

He is a mutant beyond the Omega level with vast reality manipulation and psionic powers. In particular, he has the power to “distort reality”, that is, to advance any thought or desire, even on a cosmic scale. He is also able to reorganize the molecular structure of matter and has shown to possess vast psionic powers, such as telepathy, telekinesis, the emission of bursts of force energy (concussion force), premonition and astral projection.

Being still a child, Franklin’s abilities are currently undermined, to some extent, by his limited control. Furthermore, it is not clear what level of power Franklin will eventually reach as an adult, as several future incarnations of Franklin from alternate realities, as well as the mainstream Marvel Universe, have shown that his level power varies.

An alternate manifestation of Franklin in adult form was able to destroy two Celestials of Earth-4280 during physical combat; in the aftermath of their defeat, Franklin’s immortality was heavily involved. The same individual also seized the power of his younger being to resurrect and transform Galactus into his own personal herald, after the Devourer of Worlds was rendered unconscious in a battle against an Army of the Celestials.

In terms of as yet unrealized potential, Franklin is widely regarded as the most powerful Earth-based mutant in the Marvel Universe.

1. Superman Prime (One Million)

How Strong Is Superman Prime (DC One Million)?

Real Name: Kal-El / Clark Joseph Kent
Franchise: DC Comics
Created By: Grant Morrison, Val Semeiks
Debut: DC One Million #4 (1998)

Superman Prime (DC One Million) is a version of Superman that appeared in the DC One Million comic book, written by Grant Morrison. He is actually Superman, but from the 853rd century, who survived by becoming the living extension of the Sun itself. Superman Prime (DC One Million) is actually the modern-day Superman who left Earth sometime during the late 21st century, after everyone he ever cared about had died.

He travelled the whole DC Comics universe and survived by becoming a sort of deity and an embodiment of the Sun itself. His travels lasted from the 21st century and ended somewhere around the turn of the 700th century. During his travels, he acquired tremendous skills and abilities from across the universe.

When he returned, he made a covenant with his descendants and decided to give them a small fraction of his powers, as long as they served for truth and justice. After the covenant, he left and returned to his new Fortress of Solitude in the center of the Super Sun. The time he spent in the Sun increased his already great power to presumably infinite levels.

His strength and a whole myriad of other skills he had acquired also rose to unknown levels since his time in the Sun. After the destruction of Solaris, much was revealed about Superman Prime’s (DC One Million) hibernation in the Super Sun. During this time he had been waiting for Solaris to try his hand at life because, thanks to his time-traveling younger self, he had known the events beforehand.

He knew about the DNA sample in Solaris’ core and, with the help of Lzyxm Ltpkz (the Fifth Dimension’s Superman) and Hourman, used it to his advantage, reviving his beloved Lois Lane in the process. After what seemed like an eternity to him, he had withdrawn into the Sun to await her return, and now a Silver Lois Lane and a Golden Superman Prime (DC One Million) were reunited.

In all the time since her death, life had had little meaning or warmth for him, but now Superman Prime (DC One Million) felt that he was complete again.

***

And that’s it for today. We hope you had fun reading this and that we gave you all the information you were looking for! See you next time and don’t forget to follow us!

Scroll to Top